Tagged penticton

New Hammers for a Yamaha Grand

I recently did some work on the Yamaha Grand at Penticton Alliance Church. I removed the action (the mechanical unit inside the piano that includes the keys and hammers) and brought it to my shop. I removed all of the old hammers, installed a new set of hammers and did a full regulation (adjusting all of the moving parts so they are operating properly). Old hammers develop a flat hard surface where it strikes the string creating a harsh bright tone. New hammers are softer and have a full dynamic range. Here are a few photos from the process.

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Removing old hammers from the shanks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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New hammers installed (left), hammer glueing jig waiting for hammers (right).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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New hammers installed, action re-assembled with action stack back on key bed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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At the church doing final regulation and voicing.

Piano Shack: New Life for an Old Piano

As reported in the New York Times in this article, many pianos from the turn of the century have their last note as a “thud in the dump.” It is sad but true that these 100 year old wooden mechanical instruments reach a point where it is too costly to restore them. The Naramata Centre has just retired three of their vintage upright pianos but none of them went to the landfill.

I helped out with the move and put one of them in my neighbour’s shed. It’s not quite waterproof yet, but the Piano Shack will be a great space for some experimental piano weirdness to happen.

The other two pianos went to the Shatford Centre where we will be doing a piano recycling workshop in May. We will be salvaging the wood and recycling the metal. If you are interested in coming, let me know, and get a tetanus shot.

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